SISSYDUDE REMEMBERS: DICKIE DEE BOYS…

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CBC NEWS/ WINDSOR Earl Barish started out as a Dickie Dee boy in Winnipeg, riding for two summers, starting in 1957 when he was just 14 years old. The owners of the small local business he worked for decided they wanted to sell. In what proved to be a very savvy move, the Barish brothers’ parents scraped together $2,000 to buy the business, which then consisted of about eight Dickie Dee tricycles. The business was called Dickie Dee when they bought it and Sid Barish says “there’s not meaning behind it,” as far as he knows. Earl Barish would not say how much Dickie Dee sold for in 1992, except to say his family grew it in to a “substantial business.” These days, Earl Barish runs the iconic Salisbury House chain of restaurants in Winnipeg. Sid Barish lives in Toronto and works in real estate.

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A key that helped build the ice-cream tricycle business into something “substantial” was the iconic ringing from the bells on the handlebars that would let kids know the Dickie Dee man was coming. While the business came with the name Dickie Dee the Barish family added the bells, said Sid Barish. Memories of the Dickie Dee bells ringing brings back a flood of memories for many Canadians of a certain age. How did Dickie Dee become such a beloved brand?

READ FULL CBC STORY HERE!

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One Response

  1. Nick

    Alas, these tricycles delivering icy goodness are unknown south of the border. We are truly culturally bereft.

    July 24, 2016 at 8:12 pm

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